Introduction

Welcome,

I’m an Australian psychology student passionate about mindfulness therapy– the therapeutic tool of drawing awareness and concentration back to the present moment, while accepting thoughts, states and emotions without judgement. I don’t intend to proselytize mindfulness meditation as a standalone cure for any illness; physical, mental or otherwise. I am, however, interested in the clinical efficacy for mindfulness practice, particularly as an ancillary means of assisting conventional therapies with: chronic illness (e.g. HIV, cancer, fatigue), injury rehabilitation, mental illness (e.g. anxiety, depression) and for general well-being.

Advantages of mindful awareness include, but are not limited to:

a) Lowering anxiety (general, pre-op, post-traumatic, social etc.) (10.1037/a0018555)
b) Managing stress (occupational, interpersonal, parental etc.) (10.5812/atr.8226)
c) Dealing with crises (death, loss, separation etc.) (10.1007/s10615-013-0465-y)
d) Facilitating openness to treatment/treatment barriers (physical, psychological etc.)  (10.1016/j.brat.2006.04.008)
e) Managing pain (acute, chronic etc.) (10.1177/204946371000400105)

and other issues which may contribute to the exacerbation of existing health issues.

Note: DOI’s are given in brackets. DOI’s are references by which to access the articles, they can be found by copying the reference code into the search bar at dx.doi.org

In this blog, I aim to explore new and existing journals, reports, studies and controversies relating to therapeutic mindfulness. I aim to provide detailed (and hopefully interesting) summaries of literature from the psychological, life sciences, and sociological communities. Mindfulness practice relating to religiosity, despite being an extremely fascinating and enriching tradition within many faith-communities, will not be included in this blog.

If you are interested in following me on twitter or linkedin, I won’t stop you

www.twitter.com/cailemmurray
www.linkedin.com/in/cailem

I am looking forward to writing about one of the most exciting developments in psychotherapy and conventional medicine in the past 30 years!

Cailem Murray

In the end, just three things matter: How well we have lived, how well we have loved, and how well we have learned to let go”- Jack Kornfield

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